Anne Hathaway Covers Elle UK

Anne Hathaway is featured on the cover of the November issue of “Elle UK”, here’s what she had to say about marriage, fame & validation.

On marring Adam Shulman:
“The first year of my marriage was insane. So much happened so fast, and we didn’t get to focus on just being married until about a year in. So now, it’s just about letting myself feel safe. There was a part of me that I was keeping in reserve, and when I got married, something shifted…That question of, ‘How long’s this gonna last?’ is off the table. And when you’re not worried about that, there’s space to just be silly.”

On fame:
“This fame thing? F**ked me up for a really long time. I didn’t know how to do it; I didn’t know how to engage with it; it stressed me out. And people would say, ‘You just have to be yourself,’ and I was like, ‘But I don’t know who that is yet!’”

On Matthew McConaughey:
“The man speaks in poetry. I remember once while we were filming, something got screwed up, and he said to me: ‘Look, we can get upset about this, or we can go with it and have a great story for the rest of our lives.’”

She also added:
“I’ve realized that don’t need validation from anybody. At all. I’m not sitting here now worrying, ‘What do you think of me?’ With all due respect, you seem like a lovely lady, but I don’t need you, or anyone else, to like me. And that’s so liberating. It’s a big reveal, man.”


You can read the full interview here.

Andre 3000 Covers Billbord Magazine’s October 2014 Issue


Here are some highlights:


On a new Outkast album:
“There are no plans to do [an Outkast album]. It’s not like some people think: ‘They’re about to drop this album!’ We don’t have, like, one song,” Benjamin says. “There’s no trickery or nothing like that.”

On new albums from Big Boi and himself:
“I know Big Boi’s [working on his]; I haven’t even started on [mine],” says Benjamin, then adds, sounding his common refrain: “I’ve got to find something I’m excited about.”

He added,
“I feel like I will do music in some kind of way, but something that can hit music from the back door,” says Benjamin. “Like, if I start to write screenplays and I want to [compose the soundtrack]. Or if I’m making certain product designs and I just want to release music with every shirt I design.”

On retiring from rap:
“To be clear, there’s no retirement.” And he’s not in conflict with Big Boi: “It’s kind of like growing up in a house with your brother, people expecting y’all to live in the same room and have bunk beds forever,” says Benjamin. “And people try to read into it and say people are beefing. But it’s nothing like that, man. Big Boi will always be my brother and a really important part of my life.”

On if he’ll ever act in another film:
“I do read scripts,” he says. “But I have to be excited about it to really fully throw myself into it. The older I get, I don’t know what my decisions will be. I may start just taking roles just to support myself, just kind of keep busy.”

On the killing of Ferguson teen Michael Brown:

"Honestly, I don’t have a big urge to voice [my feelings]," he says. "But I do feel kind of guilty sometimes. Like when the whole Ferguson thing went down, we were actually in England, and buddies were telling me about it, like, ‘Aw, man, it’s horrible here.’ But I didn’t feel it; I only heard about it. So I felt like, ‘Am I out of touch?’ "

Read his full interview here.

Chris Brown Covers Billboard

In an excerpt he told Billboard,

"I realize that what I do for a living opens my life to public scrutiny and that I have a responsibility to everyone because of that exposure," Brown tells Billboard. "I can say that I am only human and I have made mistakes. I can say that I try to live my life in the most true, honest way that I can. I am not perfect, no one is. No one is harder on me than me. No one can please everyone. No one can live in the past and expect to grow. I have been moving forward and hope that I am not defined by just a few moments in my life but all of the moments that will make up my life."

Boris Kodjoe Covers Upscale’s Sept/Oct Issue

Here are the highlights:

On Hollywood:

“Hollywood puts you in a box and they don’t like you stepping to the left or right of that. I’ve tried as much as I can to just spread my wings when the opportunity arose. And it’s tough, I’m not gonna lie, ‘’cause they don’t let you. You really have to scratch and fight for the chance to show them that you can do it.”

On Being a Regular Guy:

"I could walk around with security guards and make it really weird on everybody and draw a lot of attention. But I like to move around like a regular person.”

On being over people’s perceptions:

“If I started worrying about how people perceive me, I would be mad about people not realizing that I couldn’t even speak English when I first came here. People always give so much props to English actors that do an American accent convincingly. I had to learn how to walk and talk and move around so I could be accepted as somebody who plays African-American roles. There’s not one other German actor who has established himself as playing American characters. I’m proud of that. I use it as encouragement to myself that I don’t have to put limitations on where I wanna go.”

Common & Selita Ebanks Covers Uptown’s August / September 2014 Issue

Here are some highlights:

Common is no stranger to violence:
His 6-foot-8 father, Lonnie Lynn, (Common was born Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr.) was a basketball playground legend who suffered from an addiction to drugs and the fast life. He once kidnapped Common, then a toddler, and his mother at gunpoint, taking them to a tryout with the Seattle SuperSonics to prove to recruiters that he was a family man.

On almost marrying Serena Williams:
Common is single now, and enjoying his unattached life, but says he believes in marriage. He thought it would happen with Williams, but he is taking his time now before he jumps into something else. “If I’m in it as much as I was with Serena, as much as I loved her…it takes time to heal and find that peace to be able to move on.”

On being labeled as “soft”:
“I’m hardcore which to me is coming from the heart. Putting your heart on that paper and being true.”

Speaking for the first time on the death of close friend and industry peer J. Dilla:
“He was physically deteriorating. It would be sad for me to see. You know you coming home healthy. You feel guilty. It brought my own immortality to the forefront […] Until I did [“Rewind That”], I wouldn’t answer questions in interviews about him. I wouldn’t keep pictures around. That song has been part of my process in dealing with it still.”

On his tenth album Nobody’s Smiling and the youth of Chicago:
“One way of giving back is by having young Chicago artists on the album. This album is an action to increase awareness to people in the city. I owe it to Chicago […] The most beautiful thing about this project is it’s not ahead of its time, it’s not a throwback album. It feels like today. I feel like a new artist. There are people out there that don’t know my music, but they know me from acting. Some don’t know me at all.”

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